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I know it may not seem like it right now with all the recent ice and snow our area has been hit with, but believe it or not spring is on the way. As spring approaches, the weather is warming, birds are returning, and everything is coming back to life. This is when termite swarmers take to the air, to breed and spread. To protect your home from termites you need to know what signs to look for, and what property is most appetizing to these insects.

What do termites look for in a new house?

Unlike humans, termites aren't looking for a home that is near a good school, beautiful backyard exposure, or a good neighborhood. These bugs are drawn to wood and wood products. Here are some things that may draw them in.

  • If you have mulch around your home, termites will be enticed to chew on it, especially if it is wet.

  • If the soil around your home is moist, it will be more inviting to termites. Subterranean termites need moisture to have a healthy colony.

  • If your gutters are broken and standing water has caused areas of your exterior walls to rot, subterranean termites will be drawn to those weakened spots.

  • Firewood and wooden construction materials can draw termites in as well. Keep these items away from your exterior walls.

Signs of termite infestation.

  • Termites swarm in the early spring. If you see a massive cloud of insects flying in the air, be sure to determine what insect it is.

  • If a swarm comes to your home you'll find thin transparent wings all over the place.

  • Swarmers can sometimes get separated from the group. If you see a winged insect that looks like a flying and, but has only one body segment and a round head, you might have termites nearby.

  • Subterranean termites will build mud tubes in order to travel from the colony to wood sources nearby.

To protect your home from spring swarmers, partner with a pest control company to monitor and eradicate termite threats before they can damage your home. Termites do billions of dollars in property damage each year in the United States. Don't let your home be a part of that grim statistic. You've worked too hard to let your home go to the bugs.